1.1 Million Acres of Dead Trees in Oregon Because of a Terrible Droughts

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NBC reports that Oregon experienced a historic die-off of fir trees in 2022 following widespread and recurrent droughts.
According to researchers, damage to fir trees was so significant that blighted areas were referred to as "firmageddon."
Researchers estimated that about 1.1 million acres of firs had been damaged following aerial surveys.
It is the most damage recorded in a single season in the 75 years that surveys have been taken of the area.
NBC reports the widespread die-off of firs illustrates how drought is reshaping Western landscapes amid extreme heat conditions.
According to researchers, more drought-hardy species of firs could be used to repopulate dead areas, reshaping the local the ecosystem.
"When I looked at it and crunched the numbers, it was almost twice as bad as far as acres impacted than anything we had previously documented. Nature is selecting which trees get to be where during the drought." Danny DePinte, Aerial survey program manager for the U.S. Forest Service, via NBC.
According to scientists, a number of factors are contributing to widespread die-offs in Oregon, but many view droughts as the primary cause.
"There are multiple factors at play here. One of the things most of us agree on: The primary factor we have going on here is hot drought." Danny DePinte, Aerial survey program manager for the U.S. Forest Service, via NBC.
According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, almost half of Oregon is experiencing severe, extreme or exceptional droughts, with eastern Oregon the most impacted.