Positive Relationships With Adults May Help Boost Kids' Ability to Cope With Adversity
  • 2 months ago
Positive Relationships With Adults , May Help Boost Kids' Ability , to Cope With Adversity.
According to a recent study, positive bonds
with parents and other adults can play a crucial
role in fostering mental health in early adulthood. .
PsyPost reports that the research also indicated
that high levels of family religiosity may increase
stress for those who face significant childhood adversity.
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs)
refers to traumatic events
occurring up until the age of 17. .
ACEs can include instances of abuse,
neglect, violence or exposure to substance
misuse and mental health problems.
The study was motivated by the
profound impact ACEs can have on
a child's future health and well-being.
The study was motivated by the
profound impact ACEs can have on
a child's future health and well-being.
We wanted to find
out what can make
a difference for children
experiencing high adversity, Cristiane Duarte and Sara VanBronkhorst,
Study authors, via PsyPost.
We’ve known for many years
that ACEs are associated with
later mental health problems.
But we know less about factors
that can shield children from
these long-term effects of ACEs. , Cristiane Duarte and Sara VanBronkhorst,
Study authors, via PsyPost.
We wanted to understand
these factors so that we can
develop interventions that
can reduce the mental health
problems related to ACEs, Cristiane Duarte and Sara VanBronkhorst,
Study authors, via PsyPost.
We wanted to understand
these factors so that we can
develop interventions that
can reduce the mental health
problems related to ACEs, Cristiane Duarte and Sara VanBronkhorst,
Study authors, via PsyPost.
The study, published in 'JAMA Psychiatry,'
revealed that positive relationships with adults were
linked to lower levels of stress and reduced risk
of developing anxiety or depression later in life.
This finding was true
regardless of exposure to
adverse childhood experiences.
Adults can potentially make a real
difference in reducing the risk
of later mental health problems, Cristiane Duarte and Sara VanBronkhorst,
Study authors, via PsyPost