2 months ago

How Turning the Heat Off Could Damage Your Home

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Wibbitz Top Stories
How Turning the Heat Off , Could Damage Your Home.
'Newsweek' reports that people in the United States are
facing an energy crisis amid a cost of living crisis that's
leading to difficult decisions like cutting back on heating. .
According to a report by the Energy Information
Administration, households that heat with oil
or gas will see prices increase by as much as 28%. .
Last month, CNN reported that Americans
are turning their heating off entirely
in an attempt to save money. .
'Newsweek' spoke with experts to find out
about the potential damage completely
turning off the heat could do to a house.
Cold temperatures submit the various
finishes and materials in your home
to shrinking and the drying effects of
the lower relative humidity levels usually
not found in a climate-controlled home, John Cataneo, a member of the teaching staff
at NYC's Mechanics Institute, via 'Newsweek'.
Cold temperatures submit the various
finishes and materials in your home
to shrinking and the drying effects of
the lower relative humidity levels usually
not found in a climate-controlled home, John Cataneo, a member of the teaching staff
at NYC's Mechanics Institute, via 'Newsweek'.
It is most often natural materials
like wood flooring, wallpaper,
and furniture that these effects are
most noticeable at the surface level, .., John Cataneo, a member of the teaching staff
at NYC's Mechanics Institute, via 'Newsweek'.
... but pipes freezing and splitting, boilers
and radiators cracking, and refrigerant-
driven appliances breaking down are all
the next round of much deeper trouble
you want to avoid at all costs, John Cataneo, a member of the teaching staff
at NYC's Mechanics Institute, via 'Newsweek'.
... but pipes freezing and splitting, boilers
and radiators cracking, and refrigerant-
driven appliances breaking down are all
the next round of much deeper trouble
you want to avoid at all costs, John Cataneo, a member of the teaching staff
at NYC's Mechanics Institute, via 'Newsweek'.
According to 'Newsweek,' experts say that
insulating your home, while expensive,
can save money in the long run. .
Efficiency is best gained by sealing
the building or home. It doesn't matter
how efficient your heating system
is if all the heat it creates seeps
out the windows and walls, John Cataneo, a member of the teaching staff
at NYC's Mechanics Institute, via 'Newsweek'.
According to the Environmental Protection Agency,
properly insulating your home could save an average
of 15% on heating and cooling costs per year.

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