2 months ago

Loneliness May Increase Cardiovascular Risks, American Heart Association Says

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Loneliness May Increase Cardiovascular Risks, , American Heart Association Says.
'The Hill' reports that as the planet continues to come
out of isolation caused by the COVID pandemic, .
the American Heart Association (AHA) has published a review that details the importance of social interaction.
The AHA found that “social isolation and loneliness are common and appear to be independent risk factors for worse cardiovascular and brain health.” .
Given the prevalence of social disconnectedness across the U.S., the public health impact is quite significant, Crystal Wiley Cené, co-author of the statement, via press release.
Available data shows that loneliness and isolation were associated with a 30% increase in the risk of heart attack, stroke or death.
Over four decades of research has clearly demonstrated that social isolation and loneliness are both associated with adverse health outcomes, Crystal Wiley Cené, co-author of the statement, via press release.
The increased risk of death as a result of
social isolation was higher among men. .
The review also found that children who experience social isolation are more likely to succumb to obesity, high blood pressure and high blood glucose levels as adults.
Social isolation and loneliness tend to be more common among people ages 18 to 22 and 65 and older.
Social isolation and loneliness tend to be more common among people ages 18 to 22 and 65 and older.
It is unclear whether actually being isolated (social isolation) or feeling isolated (loneliness) matters most for cardiovascular and brain health because only a few studies have examined both in the same sample, Crystal Wiley Cené, co-author of the statement, via press release.
The authors cautioned that
more research is needed